Support Feminist Installation “Rub Me the Wrong Way” by Traci Talasco

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Artist Traci Talasco has maintained an active artist practice in New York City over the last 10 years and she is currently working on an installation that will be featured at the Brooklyn Arts Council. The installation "Rub Me the Wrong Way" will transform the gallery into a home environment created entirely out of sandpaper, which will wear down as you walk through the space. The title humorously refers to the unrealistic, societal expectations placed on women to "do it all", and how we become worn down by our absurd attempts to juggle everything. Traci is reaching out to the public to support the realization of this installation and she's getting very close. If you like the concept and would like to see it realized go to indiegogo to contribute financially.

Written by ricardo

March 29th, 2014 at 11:09 am

Mart Howse Performing at Hunter College, April 4th, 7pm

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martinHowseFlyer Arts Across the Curriculum and the Integrated Media Arts MFA Program at Hunter College will host a performance by Martin Howse on Friday April 4th at 7pm in the Black Box - Hunter North 543. Martin Howse is a unique new media artist who builds his own electronics and writes his own programs for performance. Berlin-based researcher, artist, inventor and performer Martin Howse traverses the electromagnetic spectrum as a space for exploration that may be manipulated to generate sound and visual. Martin Howse leads "micro_research," a mobile research platform exploring psychogeophysics and asking the questions of where precisely the plague known as software executes. Recently the Czech cultural center Školská 28 described Martin Howse performance as "heavily improvised, playing with the collapse of massed, barely functional salvaged equipment and software systems made manifest in sound/noise and image, Howse presents a complex, process-driven constructivist performance; the symphonic rise of the attempt to piece together fugal systematics is played out against the noise of collapse and machine crash at the deserted border of control."

Written by ricardo

March 26th, 2014 at 8:52 am

Exploding Earth

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Written by ricardo

March 15th, 2014 at 7:39 pm

New Helsinki Web Sketch

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[caption width="719" align="alignnone"]Helsinki Web Sketch Helsinki Web Sketch[/caption] As I continue to play with WebGL and the three.js library, I will generate compositions from photographs taken in Helsinki (until I run out of photos that I like). Check out the latest page and click through all the sketches.

Written by ricardo

February 21st, 2014 at 9:22 am

Chelsea in February: Nothing Worth Seeing

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[caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Carlos Rolon at Paul Kasmin Gallery Carlos Rolon at Paul Kasmin Gallery[/caption] The title isn't entirely true, I did step into Carlos Rolon's show at Paul Kasmin Gallery expecting to walk out quickly, but found myself drawn in by the diversity of wall pieces. Upon first look, the work all appeared slick and uniform - nice, colorful rectangles hanging beautifully on white walls. I can't say that I really cared for any of the wall pieces, they are gaudy and not very interesting, but I'm glad that I walked through the space to find an installation with a television playing an interview with Manos de Piedra, Roberto Duran... a figure from my childhood. The hidden installation is much more interesting than any of the wall pieces as it does a nice job of capturing a specific time and culture that many Latinos from my age group can identify with. Rolon born in 1970 recreated his childhood wood-panel basement in the installation and featured excerpts from televised moments with the boxer Roberto Duran. Unfortunately, I didn't document the installation. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Carlos Rolon at Paul Kasmin Gallery Carlos Rolon at Paul Kasmin Gallery[/caption] At Andrea Rosen, you can find David Altmejd's crazy, obsessive, sculptures that point to animation. I've seen several of these over the years and once you've seen one, there's not much of a need to see another. They are intricate and obsessively done, but not very interesting. I was much more intrigued by the face sculpture below than the complex, multilayered room scale plexi and mixed media sculptures. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]David Altmejd David Altmejd[/caption] Jiha Moon's work at Ryan Lee isn't very interesting or worth a visit either, but I loved the graphic comic accents in the paintings and the combination of seemingly traditional ceramics with pop culture. On the surface, the work is whimsical and fun, but doesn't do much more, beyond appearance. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Jiha Moon Jiha Moon[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Jiha Moon Jiha Moon[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Jiha Moon Jiha Moon[/caption] Keith Sonnier's work at Pace are engaging, but again they leave a bit of an empty feeling... more decorative than anything. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Keith Sonnier Keith Sonnier[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Keith Sonnier Keith Sonnier[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Keith Sonnier Keith Sonnier[/caption] I don't have anything to say about Andy Denzler paintings other than they made me long for Richter Gerhard... Though uninteresting, stylistically, I felt the need to take one photograph. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Andy Denzler Andy Denzler[/caption] Ralf Schmerberg nice colorful prints of random things he encounters are kind of interesting. I like the title of the show "Greetings from our planet." [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Ralf Schmerberg Ralf Schmerberg[/caption] Perhaps the high light of the stroll through Chelsea was the John Ahearn sculptures at Alexander and Bonin. But once again, I came away feeling a bit empty as I've experienced Ahearn's work on the street where it belongs and it's much more powerful than in a gallery. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]John Ahearn John Ahearn[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]John Ahearn John Ahearn[/caption] Nearly every time, I do a Chelsea Gallery walk, I find something redeeming, worth seeing, but this February, I unfortunately did not come across anything interesting. And to top it off, the fashion people due to Fashion Week made the walk really annoying. And sadly, on the way to the subway, I came across this horrific scene where an MTA driver lost his life. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Bus Crash, 12 February, 2014, NYC Bus Crash, 12 February, 2014, NYC[/caption]

“Can City” by Studio Swine

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Can City from Studio Swine on Vimeo.

This is a brilliant project by art/design collective Studio Swine (Azusa Murakami and Alexander Groves). With so much waste and stuff in the world, do we really need to keep producing more? This project recycles waste - used vegetable oil and aluminum cans to create new aluminum objects via a mobile foundry. It's an inspiring project executed in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Written by ricardo

February 7th, 2014 at 7:02 am

Interview with Migrant Activists

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In 2012, as I worked on an installation for the New York Hall of Science titled "a geography of being | una geografia de ser," I enlisted the help of undocumented immigrant activists Cesar and Vishal. I asked them to help me conceptualize a video game that would portray some of the experiences commonly felt by immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. We met a few times over food and had extended discussions. I found some of their experiences and observations so enlightening that I have been meaning to post excerpts from the interviews that others may find helpful and insightful. Below is one excerpt concerning day to day fears that they have lived with; fears that have been confronted by becoming activists and making their status public. Other topics include assimlation/de-assimilation, going to college, romantic and familial love. Listen to all the interviews here.

Written by ricardo

February 4th, 2014 at 1:13 pm

Duke Riley at MagnanMetz Gallery

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[caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Duke Riley's Pigeon Coop Duke Riley's Pigeon Coop was in use at the Florida Keys before gallery installation[/caption] Artist Duke Riley is a pigeon guy and for his recent project, he worked as a pigeon trainer in the Florida Keys. As the New York Times Article "Avian Artistry, With Smuggled Cigars" states "He started the training in Florida last year with 50 pigeons; 23 went on the first mission, this summer. Only 11 returned." (The NY Times video is well worth watching.) The mission for the pigeons was a small political intervention... they served as documentarians or Cuban Cohiba cigar smugglers. Some of the pigeons carried small cameras that captured their travel between the Florida Keys and Cuba others travelled from Florida with empty harnesses to return with cigars. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Pigeon paintings by Duke Riley Pigeon paintings by Duke Riley[/caption] The pigeon project's artifacts are installed in the first gallery of MegnanMetz until 25 of January 2014, where you can see the pigeon coop with the pigeons still living in it, pigeon paintings, pigeon mosaics made from sea shells and videos that the pigeons made as well as other artifacts. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Pigeon paintings by Duke Riley Pigeon paintings by Duke Riley[/caption] The second gallery presents documentation of a collaborative performance along the canals of Zhujiajiao in China that re-stages a legendary race of the Chinese zodiac. A projected wall video shows the race and along another wall are mounted animal masks that performers wore to represent the various creatures of the Chinese zodiac. On the wall opposite from the video is a large scale drawing capturing the legend of the Chinese zodiac. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Duke Riley's masks from the Chinese zodiac Duke Riley's masks from the Chinese zodiac[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]A large scale drawing reflecting the legend of the Chinese zodiac Chinese zodiac by Duke Riley[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]A large scale drawing reflecting the legend of the Chinese zodiac Chinese zodiac by Duke Riley[/caption] [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]A large scale drawing reflecting the legend of the Chinese zodiac Chinese zodiac by Duke Riley[/caption]

Written by ricardo

January 14th, 2014 at 6:39 am

Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin

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[caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin[/caption] Alex Prager employed a soundstage in Hollywood to create her latest set of works. Near the street entrance hang beautiful large scale color photographs and toward the back is an immersive three-channel video installation that the prints appear to be taken from. As the press release describes the video installation
the film opens with a series of confessional monologues in which characters from the crowd scenes poignantly relate their own stories and insights, such as childhood memories, recurring nightmares and personal revelations. Suddenly, the scene changes and an orchestra strikes as a sea of people flood into view. The iconic heroine then leads the viewer on a journey through the crowd wordlessly expressing a range of emotions including isolation, sadness, confusion, curiosity and anxiety. The juxtaposition of character monologues and the frenetic crowd scene poignantly illustrates that within a swirling sea of strangers, there are countless individual stories and unique experiences unfolding.
The concept is striking and the video could easily be longer by portraying more individuals in the beginning portion. In fact the small number of portraits at the beginning undermines the concept. I believe that commonly, individuals living in dense urban environments desire to peak into the lives of others. That is to have the opportunity to observe the day to day lives of ones neighbors or the person sitting across one in the subway. This has been a common motif in films as characters use binoculars or telescope to spy on the neighbors. The power of bird's eye view of a multitude of individuals flowing in a public space that is presented in the video would be enhanced if the viewer begins to identify individuals from the portraits. [caption width="720" align="alignnone"]Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin[/caption] One other element that I'm critical off is the need to stylize the individuals in the video. The people in portraits were highly made up to the extent that they seem to represent stereotypes. This exaggeration reduces the gravitas that the work may otherwise carry. Perhaps by evoking stereotypes, the artist is reflecting on how mediated our lives are or that our lives are but a fiction.

Written by ricardo

January 13th, 2014 at 7:12 am

Breaking News

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[caption width="500" align="alignnone"]barbara walters Barbara Walters vector style[/caption] Soon, I'll be launching an RSS feed featuring illustration of famous news broadcasters such as Barbara Walters. Each news broadcast personality will be set against the icon or colors of the corporation they worked for.

Written by ricardo

January 7th, 2014 at 8:06 pm